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Accurate Clock Pendulums$
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Robert J. Matthys

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780198529712

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198529712.001.0001

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Position sensitivity along the pendulum rod

Position sensitivity along the pendulum rod

Chapter:
(p.167) Chapter 24 Position sensitivity along the pendulum rod
Source:
Accurate Clock Pendulums
Author(s):

Robert James Matthys

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198529712.003.0024

Every clock's pendulum needs a fine trim to adjust its rate to the desired value. This is frequently done by adding small weights to a weight pan, which is usually located about one-third of the way down the pendulum rod. The clock literature says that the effect of adding a small weight to a pendulum will vary, depending on the weight's location along the pendulum rod. The literature also says that the weight will have maximum effect on the pendulum's rate if placed halfway between the bob and the suspension spring, and will have zero effect if placed at the center of the bob or at the suspension spring. This chapter describes an experiment that was carried out to measure the position sensitivity of a pendulum rod by clamping a 24-gram weight on the pendulum rod at a given location and calculating the change in clock rate.

Keywords:   pendulum rod, clock rate, position sensitivity, bob, weight, suspension spring

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