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Accurate Clock Pendulums$
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Robert J. Matthys

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780198529712

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198529712.001.0001

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Stability of suspension spring materials

Stability of suspension spring materials

Chapter:
(p.143) Chapter 20 Stability of suspension spring materials
Source:
Accurate Clock Pendulums
Author(s):

Robert James Matthys

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198529712.003.0020

A pendulum's suspension spring is so simple physically, and yet so complicated in questions of size, what material to use, bending fatigue, length stability, the effects of its Young's modulus varying with temperature, how to solidly grab hold of its top and bottom ends, whether to use one spring or two, etc. This chapter deals with the first four questions. The suspension spring's length, thickness, and material are varied to determine how these parameters affect the pendulum's timing and thermal hysteresis. The goal is to improve the timing and reduce the thermal hysteresis. This chapter covers what actually happens in practice to a pendulum when the suspension spring's length, thickness, and material are changed. Experimental results show that type 642 aluminum silicon bronze, hard temper, is the best material for a pendulum's suspension spring.

Keywords:   suspension spring, stability, pendulum, thermal hysteresis, aluminum silicon bronze, length, thickness, bending fatigue

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