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Reprogramming the Cerebral CortexPlasticity following central and peripheral lesions$
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Stephen Lomber and Jos Eggermont

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780198528999

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198528999.001.0001

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Development, maintenance and plasticity of tonotopic projections from cochlea to auditory cortex

Development, maintenance and plasticity of tonotopic projections from cochlea to auditory cortex

Chapter:
(p.159) Chapter 8 Development, maintenance and plasticity of tonotopic projections from cochlea to auditory cortex
Source:
Reprogramming the Cerebral Cortex
Author(s):

Robert V. Harrison

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198528999.003.0008

Patterns of neural activity generated at peripheral sensory organs are influential in the development, maintenance, and plastic change to central brain areas. This chapter explores these mechanisms in the auditory system, specifically in the context of cochleotopic (tonotopic) projections up to cortex. It briefly reviews a series of studies in which tonotopic map reorganization is observed as a result of experimental changes to patterns of neural input from the cochlea. It discusses some of the practical (clinical) implications of new knowledge on auditory system plasticity. Finally, it extends discussions of brain plasticity to consider not just neurons, but also other cortical components such as glial cells and blood vasculature.

Keywords:   neural activity, auditory system plasticity, cochleotopic projections, tonotopic map

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