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Reprogramming the Cerebral CortexPlasticity following central and peripheral lesions$
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Stephen Lomber and Jos Eggermont

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780198528999

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198528999.001.0001

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Remodeling of cortical connections and enhanced long-term potentiation after lesions of the visual cortex

Remodeling of cortical connections and enhanced long-term potentiation after lesions of the visual cortex

Chapter:
(p.61) Chapter 3 Remodeling of cortical connections and enhanced long-term potentiation after lesions of the visual cortex
Source:
Reprogramming the Cerebral Cortex
Author(s):

Ulf T. Eysel

Thomas Mittmann

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198528999.003.0003

Long-term potentiation (LTP) was first described in the mammalian hippocampus and was also elicited in the visual cortex of rats. LTP is most strongly expressed during early postnatal development when synaptic plasticity is high. To test the hypothesis that lesion-induced reorganization in the visual cortex is associated with increased LTP, this chapter examines synaptic plasticity in slices of the lesioned rat visual cortex in vitro. Characteristic changes are in plasticity are observed in the surround of lesions, supporting the hypothesis of enhanced LTP being involved in reprogramming of the visual cortex in response to local damage in the adult visual cortex.

Keywords:   cat visual cortex, rat visual cortex, LTM, hippocampus, cortical lesions

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