Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Reprogramming the Cerebral CortexPlasticity following central and peripheral lesions$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Stephen Lomber and Jos Eggermont

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780198528999

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198528999.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 15 September 2019

Reorganization of somatosensory and motor cortex following peripheral nerve or spinal cord injury in primates

Reorganization of somatosensory and motor cortex following peripheral nerve or spinal cord injury in primates

Chapter:
(p.285) Chapter 15 Reorganization of somatosensory and motor cortex following peripheral nerve or spinal cord injury in primates
Source:
Reprogramming the Cerebral Cortex
Author(s):

Jon H. Kaas

Yvonne Rothemund

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198528999.003.0015

Damage to peripheral nerves or the central axons of those nerves in the spinal cord disrupts the normal flow of information to the brain, and the output of the brain via motor neuron projections to muscles. These lesions have immediate consequences for sensory processing and motor control, and start a process of compensation first involving rebalancing of inhibition and excitation in central circuits, followed by an array of changes in gene expression, neurotransmitters and receptor expression, synaptic adjustments and neuron growth and retraction. The changes, commonly referred to as reorganizations, often promote partial recoveries, but they can lead to perception errors and movement disorders. This chapter focuses on reorganizations that have been experimentally studied in monkeys, and compares the results with those that have been obtained in noninvasive studies in humans. The emphasis is on sensory and motor cortex, where reorganizations have most extensively been explored, but subcortical alterations related to cortical reorganizations are also reviewed.

Keywords:   spinal cord damage, cortical reorganization, monkeys, humans, somatosensory system, motor cortex

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .