Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Tribology on the Small ScaleA Bottom Up Approach to Friction, Lubrication, and Wear$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

C. Mathew Mate

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780198526780

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198526780.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 29 March 2020

PHYSICAL ORIGINS OF SURFACE FORCES

PHYSICAL ORIGINS OF SURFACE FORCES

Chapter:
(p.137) 7 PHYSICAL ORIGINS OF SURFACE FORCES
Source:
Tribology on the Small Scale
Author(s):

C. Mathew Mate

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198526780.003.0007

The energies and forces between contacting surfaces originate from the interaction forces between atoms and molecules. This chapter discusses how these atomic level forces lead to various types of forces as two surfaces are brought into contact. It covers the interactions between atoms (repulsive atomic potentials and van der Waals interactions), the interactions within liquid and aqueous media (solvation forces, electrostatic double-layer, hydration repulsion, hydrophobic attraction), and electrostatic interactions from contact electrification. Due to their ubiquitous effect on adhesion, van der Waals interactions are discussed at length, and examples are given for calculating adhesive forces in different geometries using Hamaker constants.

Keywords:   Van der Waals force, Hamaker constant, solvation forces, electrostatic double-layer, hydration repulsion, hydrophobic attraction, contact electrification

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .