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Coronary Heart Disease EpidemiologyFrom aetiology to public health$
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Michael Marmot and Paul Elliott

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780198525738

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198525738.001.0001

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Systematic review of prospective cohort studies of psychosocial factors in the aetiology and prognosis of coronary heart disease

Systematic review of prospective cohort studies of psychosocial factors in the aetiology and prognosis of coronary heart disease

Chapter:
(p.363) Chapter 24 Systematic review of prospective cohort studies of psychosocial factors in the aetiology and prognosis of coronary heart disease
Source:
Coronary Heart Disease Epidemiology
Author(s):

H. Kuper

M. Marmot

H. Hemingway

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198525738.003.0025

This chapter assesses the relative strength of the epidemiological evidence for causal links between psychosocial factors and coronary heart disease (CHD) incidence among healthy populations and prognosis among CHD patients. Prospective studies published up until 2001 identified seventy reports of aetiological effects and ninety-two reports of prognostic effects by psychosocial factors. Based on prospective epidemiological data, there was indication for an association between depression, social support, and psychosocial work characteristics with CHD aetiology and prognosis. The randomized trials, to date, have been negative. Evidence for an effect of anxiety or type A behaviour was less consistent.

Keywords:   CHD, cardiovascular disease, risk factors, epidemiological evidence, causal links

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