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Statistical ThoughtA Perspective and History$
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Shoutir Kishore Chatterjee

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780198525318

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198525318.001.0001

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BREAKING THE BARRIER: OUT INTO A BROADER DOMAIN

BREAKING THE BARRIER: OUT INTO A BROADER DOMAIN

Chapter:
(p.265) 9 BREAKING THE BARRIER: OUT INTO A BROADER DOMAIN
Source:
Statistical Thought
Author(s):

Shoutir Kishore Chatterjee

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198525318.003.0009

By the 1830s, as large volumes of official data were compiled and tabulated, frequential regularity exhibited by them inspired some mathematicians (Venn, C. S. Peirce) to develop the frequency theory of probability and some others (Poisson, Quetelet) to apply the statistical tools of the ‘theory of errors’ to new fields. Among them, Quetelet extensively used the binomial and normal models to study demographic, judicial, and anthropometric data, but he was interested mainly in studying ‘true values’. Later, Galton, in course of studying heredity on the basis of biometric data, recognized the importance of variability and developed empirically bivariate regression, correlation, and the bivariate normal model. Edgeworth, Karl Pearson, and Yule extended Galton’s results and methods to the multivariate case. Empirical studies also led to the formulation of new problems of inference relating to correlation.

Keywords:   frequential regularity, C. S. Peirce, Quetelet, Galton, Edgeworh, Karl Pearson, Yule, bivariate, multivariate, regression

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