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Gesture, Speech, and Sign$
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Lynn Messing and Ruth Campbell

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780198524519

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198524519.001.0001

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Neural disorders of language and movement: evidence from American Sign Language

Neural disorders of language and movement: evidence from American Sign Language

Chapter:
(p.27) Chapter 2 Neural disorders of language and movement: evidence from American Sign Language
Source:
Gesture, Speech, and Sign
Author(s):

David P. Corina

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198524519.003.0002

This chapter provides an overview of three neurological disorders affecting sign language use and serves to illustrate how knowledge of the structure of sign languages can be instrumental in cultivating a more thorough understanding of the neurological basis of language and motor systems. Investigations of sign language aphasia serve to underscore the importance of left-hemisphere structures for signed languages. Studies of signers with Parkinson's disease provide novel insight into the extrapyramidal motor system's role in the execution of the complex sequential movements which comprise American Sign Language (ASL). Finally, a discussion of apraxic disorders helps to frame the differences between complex linguistic gestural systems such as ASL and limb control in the service of pantomime and object use.

Keywords:   neurological disorders, sign language, motor system, aphasia, Parkinson's disease, apraxic disorders

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