Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Prefrontal CortexExecutive and Cognitive Functions$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

A. C. Roberts, T. W. Robbins, and L. Weiskrantz

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9780198524410

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198524410.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 23 October 2019

Specialized systems for the processing of mnemonic information within the primate frontal cortex

Specialized systems for the processing of mnemonic information within the primate frontal cortex

Chapter:
(p.103) 8 Specialized systems for the processing of mnemonic information within the primate frontal cortex
Source:
The Prefrontal Cortex
Author(s):

Michael Petrides

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198524410.003.0008

This chapter explores the role of the lateral frontal cortex in mnemonic processing since any damage to it leads to severe impairment of mnemonic performance. It emphasizes that the mid-dorsolateral frontal cortex is critical for the monitoring of events in working memory and the impairment on the self-ordered and externally ordered working memory tasks after mid-dorsolateral frontal lesions occur against a background of normal basic mnemonic processing. The chapter discusses the two-level hypothesis that is fundamentally different from another current theoretical position, which suggests that the various prefrontal areas perform a similar role in working memory, but that each will process different types of information. This in turn makes a distinction between active (strategic) retrieval, which requires ventrolateral frontal cortex, and automatic retrieval that does not.

Keywords:   cortex, mnemonic processing, two-level hypothesis, theoretical position, retrieval

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .