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Face and Mind$
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Andrew W. Young

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9780198524205

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198524205.001.0001

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Recognition and reality

Recognition and reality

Chapter:
(p.261) 10 Recognition and reality
Source:
Face and Mind
Author(s):

Andrew W. Young

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198524205.003.0010

An intriguing set of issues arises from work in cognitive neuropsychiatry, and these are touched on in this chapter. They include what makes people's percepts normally seem so real to them. Delusions in which the feeling of things being real seems to be dysfunctional also raise important questions about the sense of self and self-existence. This chapter examines how visual recognition mechanisms support the experience of reality by looking at some of the consequences of recognition impairments, and especially those caused by brain injury. This involves considering how one's emotional reactions to visual stimuli relate to their ability to recognize them, and examining preserved non-conscious aspects of recognition in cases of face recognition impairment after brain injury (prosopagnosia), everyday recognition errors, and delusional misidentifications in psychiatric and neuropsychiatric patients.

Keywords:   cognitive neuropsychiatry, delusions, self-existence, visual recognition mechanisms, brain injury

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