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Comparative Neuropsychology$
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A. David Milner

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9780198524113

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198524113.001.0001

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Interhemispheric transfer following partial commissurotomy in humans and monkeys

Interhemispheric transfer following partial commissurotomy in humans and monkeys

Chapter:
(p.127) 8 Interhemispheric transfer following partial commissurotomy in humans and monkeys
Source:
Comparative Neuropsychology
Author(s):

Madeline J. Eacott

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198524113.003.0008

The size and prominent position of the corpus callosum in the brain led to it being one of the earliest structures to be investigated. While much progress has been made since that time in researchers' understanding of the role that the corpus callosum plays in the transfer of information between the two cerebral hemispheres, there are still gaps in their knowledge. This chapter attempts to review what has been learnt about interhemispheric communication in the monkey, where the corpus callosum and anterior commissure between them contain about 53 million fibres, and compares this with what is known about the role of the corpus callosum and anterior commissure in humans.

Keywords:   information transfer, cerebral hemispheres, interhemispheric communication, anterior commissure, corpus callosum

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