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Comparative Neuropsychology$
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A. David Milner

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9780198524113

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198524113.001.0001

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Ettlinger at Bay: can visual agnosia be explained by low-level visual impairments?

Ettlinger at Bay: can visual agnosia be explained by low-level visual impairments?

Chapter:
(p.30) 3 Ettlinger at Bay: can visual agnosia be explained by low-level visual impairments?
Source:
Comparative Neuropsychology
Author(s):

Alan Cowey

Paul Dean

Larry Weiskrantz

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198524113.003.0003

The importance of the inferior temporal neocortex in visual discrimination learning and remembering in macaque monkeys was established in the 1950s by several investigators, including George Ettlinger. It is salutary to note that the importance of the ventral temporal lobe in vision was established by Ettlinger and his contemporaries long before extra-striate visual areas were known, as demonstrated electrophysiologically. Although the monkeys with inferotemporal or latero-ventral prestriate ablation were visually ‘agnosic’ their sensory status was resolutely normal, with the exception of chromatic discrimination, which is irrelevant to achromatic shape perception.

Keywords:   George Ettlinger, visual agnosia, chromatic discrimination, macaque monkeys, prestriate ablation, ventral temporal lobe

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