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The Measurement of Sensation$
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Donald Laming

Print publication date: 1997

Print ISBN-13: 9780198523420

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198523420.001.0001

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How, then, can sensation be measured?

How, then, can sensation be measured?

Chapter:
(p.205) 13 How, then, can sensation be measured?
Source:
The Measurement of Sensation
Author(s):

Donald Laming

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198523420.003.0013

This final chapter summarizes the preceding arguments and identifies those experimental results that can be relied upon because they are uncontaminated with introspective reports (such as magnitude estimates). These results include the respective variabilities of sensory discrimination and of psychophysical judgment, the correlation of successive magnitude estimates, and the different structural properties of discriminations between two separate stimuli and the detection of increments. Sensation, of course, is a matter of common experience; the contentious issue is whether it can be measured in any meaningful way. This issue is illustrated with two examples, from simultaneous contrast and from the perception of tactile roughness.

Keywords:   correlation, increment detection, sensory discrimination, simultaneous contrast, tactile roughness, variability

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