Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Cyril BurtFraud or Framed?$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

N. J. Mackintosh

Print publication date: 1995

Print ISBN-13: 9780198523369

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198523369.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 03 June 2020

Declining educational standards

Declining educational standards

Chapter:
(p.95) Five Declining educational standards
Source:
Cyril Burt
Author(s):

N. J. Mackintosh

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198523369.003.0005

Burt frequently pointed out that the average IQ of middle-class children might be, indeed was, higher than that of working-class children, but the fact that there were so many more of the latter than of the former meant that there were actually more working-class than middle-class children with an IQ of, say, 115 or more. In spite of which, the vast majority of university students came from middle-class backgrounds. If this might, even today, be regarded as a reasonably liberal point of view, some of Burt's other attitudes towards educational selection, undoubtedly progressive in the 1920s and 1930s, were widely denounced as reactionary in the 1950s and 1960s by progressive educational thinkers and politicians.

Keywords:   average IQ, middle-class children, educational standards, working-class children, university students, educational selection

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .