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Infant Vision$
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François Vital-Durand, Janette Atkinson, and Oliver J. Braddick

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780198523161

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198523161.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 28 March 2020

Prediction of myopia in children

Prediction of myopia in children

Chapter:
(p.125) 9 Prediction of myopia in children
Source:
Infant Vision
Author(s):

Jane Gwiazda

Joseph Bauer

Frank Thorn

Richard Held

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198523161.003.0009

Children who become myopic generally do so sometime between seven and thirteen years of age. The aetiology of this school-age myopia has been debated for centuries. The latest research indicates that, although myopia has a genetic component, close-up visual activity, such as reading and playing computer games, also contributes to the genesis and progression of myopia in susceptible eyes. Recent findings from longitudinal studies of refraction indicate that it is now possible to predict whether an infant will become myopic at school age. This chapter reviews some of the new findings relevant to the prediction of myopia in children.

Keywords:   myopia, aetiology, close-up visual activity, longitudinal studies, school-age myopia, genetic component, susceptible eyes

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