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The Biology and Conservation of Wild Canids$
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David W. Macdonald and Claudio Sillero-Zubiri

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780198515562

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198515562.001.0001

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Patagonian foxes

Patagonian foxes

Selection for introduced prey and conservation of culpeo and chilla foxes in Patagonia

Chapter:
(p.243) CHAPTER 15 Patagonian foxes
Source:
The Biology and Conservation of Wild Canids
Author(s):

Andrés J. Novaro

Martín C. Funes

Jaime E. Jiménez

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198515562.003.0015

The culpeo (Pseudalopex culpaeus) and the South American grey fox or chilla (P. griseus) are closely related canids that live in western and southern South America. This chapter examines patterns of prey selection by culpeos and chillas in areas where the two species are sympatric and: (1) where sheep were abundant and the main wild prey, lagomorphs, had different densities; (2) where both canids were protected and sheep density was low. These comparisons are used to evaluate the competitive relationships between the culpeo and chilla and the factors that determine predation on livestock. The comparisons are based on two studies that reported data on culpeo and chilla food habits and a broad array of prey availability, and on unpublished information from one of these studies.

Keywords:   culpeo, Pseudalopex culpaeus, South American grey fox, chilla, Pseudalopex griseus, prey selection, competition, predation

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