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Insect Physiological EcologyMechanisms and Patterns$
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Steven L. Chown and Sue Nicolson

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780198515494

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198515494.001.0001

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Thermoregulation

Thermoregulation

Chapter:
(p.154) CHAPTER 6 Thermoregulation
Source:
Insect Physiological Ecology
Author(s):

Steven L. Chown

Sue W. Nicolson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198515494.003.0006

Flight performance in insects is inextricably linked with behavioural and physiological thermoregulation. This chapter deals especially with the evolutionary implications of insect thermoregulation and reviews the basic mechanisms and principles, including those at the biophysical level. Wide-ranging studies are described that examine thermoregulation in bees, butterflies, and dragonflies from the level of enzyme function through to flight performance and thermal ecology. The ecological and evolutionary implications of endothermy have been strongly emphasized in recent research, an example being elegant analyses of interactions between flight pattern, morphology, palatability, and thermoregulation in Neotropical butterfly assemblages.

Keywords:   behavioural regulation, colour, ectotherm, endothermy, evaporative cooling, muscle physiology, palatability, power output

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