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The Neurobiology of Spatial Behaviour$
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K.J. Jeffery

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780198515241

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198515241.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 19 November 2019

How does path integration interact with olfaction, vision, and the representation of space?

How does path integration interact with olfaction, vision, and the representation of space?

Chapter:
(p.48) Chapter 3 How does path integration interact with olfaction, vision, and the representation of space?
Source:
The Neurobiology of Spatial Behaviour
Author(s):

Ariane S. Etienne

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198515241.003.0003

This chapter examines how path integration acts in concert with other navigational processes. It specifically investigates the interplay between motion cues and other sensory cues. It then turns to the way in which location-based cues (mainly visual) and path integration can cooperate in orienting the animal. The first part of this chapter specifically deals with route-based navigation in itself. The second part discusses how rodents complement route-based direction and position information with location-based references from the familiar environment. In addition, it describes how the internal compass and path integration offers the subject with a directional and positional reference frame for the selection and use of local cues. It ends with current data and hypotheses on the role of path integration and the internal sense of direction in building up and using a map of the environment, and, conversely, how the internal representation of space may facilitate the performance of a journey that is planned through path integration. The data generally confirm that in mammals, navigation is controlled by an integrated system.

Keywords:   path integration, olfaction, vision, space representation, navigation, rodents, sense of direction

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