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The Neurobiology of Spatial Behaviour$
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K.J. Jeffery

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780198515241

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198515241.001.0001

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Spatial coding in the hippocampal formation: input, information type, plasticity, and behaviour

Spatial coding in the hippocampal formation: input, information type, plasticity, and behaviour

Chapter:
(p.199) Chapter 11 Spatial coding in the hippocampal formation: input, information type, plasticity, and behaviour
Source:
The Neurobiology of Spatial Behaviour
Author(s):

Colin Lever

Francesca Cacucci

Tom Wills

Stephen Burton

Alastair McClelland

Neil Burgess

John O’Keefe

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198515241.003.0011

This chapter takes an analytical approach to the construction of place fields in order to explore what information the cells receive and from which areas, and how they piece this together to produce the phenomena seen in the laboratory. It concentrates on place cells in rodents. First, it briefly sketches key aspects of hippocampal formation connectivity in order to ground discussion in later sections. It then surveys the types of spatial information required by cognitive map theory, and their instantiation in the hippocampal formation. In addition, recent evidence relevant to encoding of distance and speed is considered. It also describes the degree to which experience-dependent plasticity is required to explain hippocampal place cell characteristics and functioning, and outlines data showing long-term plasticity in place cells, suggesting they form a substrate for incidental environmental learning. Some consideration is given to the nature of the plasticity involved. Furthermore, it addresses the aspects of the relationship between the hippocampal formation and behaviour in the spatial domain.

Keywords:   place cells, spatial coding, hippocampal formation, cognitive map theory, spatial information, plasticity, spatial behaviour

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