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The Cognitive and Neural Bases of Spatial Neglect$
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Hans-Otto Karnath, A. David Milner, and Giuseppe Vallar

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780198508335

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198508335.001.0001

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Primary sensory deficits after right brain damage—an attentional disorder by any other name?

Primary sensory deficits after right brain damage—an attentional disorder by any other name?

Chapter:
(p.327) 6.2 Primary sensory deficits after right brain damage—an attentional disorder by any other name?
Source:
The Cognitive and Neural Bases of Spatial Neglect
Author(s):

Peter W. Halligan

John C. Marshall

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198508335.003.0023

This chapter provides a review of primary sensory deficits after right brain damage. It begins by presenting the historical basis for the conceptual divide between ‘primary’ and ‘high-level’ deficits. A number of converging studies have demonstrated that impairments such as visual field deficits, somatosensory disorders, and motor disorders, traditionally conceived as primary deficits, involve impairments of higher-order cognitive processes. The mere clinical fact that some patients show deficits on one set of tasks whereas others show deficits on other tasks does not in itself provide sufficient reason to justify a qualitative distinction between visual field deficit (VFD) and visual-spatial neglect (VSN).

Keywords:   primary sensory deficits, right brain damage, somatosensory disorders, motor disorders

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