Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Colour PerceptionMind and the physical world$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Rainer Mausfeld and Dieter Heyer

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780198505006

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198505006.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 30 March 2020

‘Colour’ As Part of the Format of Different Perceptual Primitives: The Dual Coding of Colour

‘Colour’ As Part of the Format of Different Perceptual Primitives: The Dual Coding of Colour

Chapter:
(p.380) (p.381) Chapter 13 ‘Colour’ As Part of the Format of Different Perceptual Primitives: The Dual Coding of Colour
Source:
Colour Perception
Author(s):

Rainer Mausfeld

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198505006.003.0013

This chapter approaches colour from the perspective of cognitive science, which has marshalled convincing evidence that our mental apparatus is equipped with a rich internal structure pertaining to, for example, structural knowledge about properties of the physical world, distinguishing between physical and biological objects, or imputing mental states to oneself and to others. With respect to perception theory, this evidence indicates that the structure of internal coding is built up in terms of a rich set of representational primitives. This chapter also argues that colour plays different roles in different representational primitives. Rather than asking what colour really is, or making presuppositions about its ‘proper causal antecedents’ or about the ‘proper intentional objects’ of colour, the focus is on how it figures within the structure of representational primitives of perception.

Keywords:   colour, cognitive science, perception theory, representation primitives, perception

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .