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The Mortality Crisis in Transitional Economies$
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Giovanni Andrea Cornia and Renato Paniccià

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780198297413

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198297413.001.0001

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The Mortality Consequences of the Transition to Market Economy in Latvia, 1991–1995

The Mortality Consequences of the Transition to Market Economy in Latvia, 1991–1995

Chapter:
(p.280) 12 The Mortality Consequences of the Transition to Market Economy in Latvia, 1991–1995
Source:
The Mortality Crisis in Transitional Economies
Author(s):

Juris Krumins

Uldis Usackis

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198297413.003.0012

During the 19th and 20th centuries, Latvia — as well as its neighbouring countries of Estonia and Lithuania forming the Baltic States — enjoyed a remarkable healthcare system resulting in a life expectancy of ten years longer than that of Russia’s. It’s life expectancy even exceeded the life expectancies of Italy, Germany and Austria. When Latvia was politically independent, its life expectancy further increased by two years. However, events like World War II, repression against civil population, collapse of the USSR, the persistent mismanagement of the USSR and the subsequent transition from command economy to market economy strongly influenced the population of Latvia. The chapter particularly studies the factors affecting the mortality rate of Latvia during the transition period which shall base its findings from statistical data.

Keywords:   Latvia, life expectancy, mortality rate, USSR, Baltic States, command economy, market economy

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