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Knowledge AssetsSecuring Competitive Advantage in the Information Economy$
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Max H. Boisot

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780198296072

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198296072.001.0001

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Recapitulation and Conclusion

Recapitulation and Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.254) 11 Recapitulation and Conclusion
Source:
Knowledge Assets
Author(s):

Max H. Boisot

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198296072.003.0011

This final chapter explores the broader implications of the analysis for strategic management of knowledge assets in the twenty-first century. In industrialized countries, this kind of management perhaps holds the key to continued prosperity and social stability. In the emerging economies it offers the prospect of by-passing the dreadful and dehumanizing experience of industrialization through which developed countries initially secured their wealth. As things stand, neither industrialized nor industrializing economies have yet developed a managerial orientation appropriate to the needs of the information economy in general, or the phenomenon of knowledge assets in particular. It has been shown here that far more important than having the physical resources is the ability to do something intelligent with them.

Keywords:   strategic management, knowledge assets, twenty-first century, social stability, prosperity, emerging economies, industrialization, developed countries, managerial orientation, information economy

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