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Governing in Europe: Effective and Democratic?$
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Fritz Scharpf

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780198295457

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198295457.001.0001

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Conclusion: Multi-Level Problem-Solving in Europe

Conclusion: Multi-Level Problem-Solving in Europe

Chapter:
(p.187) Conclusion: Multi-Level Problem-Solving in Europe
Source:
Governing in Europe: Effective and Democratic?
Author(s):

Fritz Scharpf

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198295457.003.0007

This chapter returns to the issue of democratic legitimacy. Even though European institutions in their present shape are able to convey output-oriented legitimacy, the policies that can in fact be adopted under these conditions are limited in their problem-solving capacity. However, these European policies do contribute to a ‘democratic deficit’ at the national level as governments find themselves increasingly constrained by the legal rules of negative integration and by the economic competition among national systems of regulation. It seems worth exploring, therefore, whether this regulatory competition could itself be regulated by the evolution of a European ‘law of unfair regulatory competition’.

Keywords:   legitimacy, democracy, Europe, problem-solving, negative integration, economic integration, regulatory competition, positive integration

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