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The Volume and Dynamics of International Migration and Transnational Social Spaces$
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Thomas Faist

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780198293910

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198293910.001.0001

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Situating the First Puzzle: Why So Few Migrants and Why So Many?

Situating the First Puzzle: Why So Few Migrants and Why So Many?

Chapter:
(p.60) 3 Situating the First Puzzle: Why So Few Migrants and Why So Many?
Source:
The Volume and Dynamics of International Migration and Transnational Social Spaces
Author(s):

Thomas Faist

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198293910.003.0003

Before turning to how relative immobility and chain migration proceed, there is a need to explain how macro-conditions set the stage for ‘Why so few out of most places?’ and ‘Why so many out of very few places?’. Only these details are known about the starting conditions of migration processes and the setup under which migrant networks form later, can one hope to unearth the endogenous dynamics of international South to North migration flows. Domestically, developments of law took a turn in reinforcing international human rights law, concerning the civil rights of long-term residents. This helped the international human rights regime to gain validity, although in itself it lacks sufficient implementation and enforcement powers. Yet the very principles of modern welfare states that grant rights to alien newcomers primarily according to the residence principle have proved most important on the domestic level.

Keywords:   North to South migration, migration processes, human rights, welfare states, migration flow, civil rights, domestic law, alien newcomers, residence principle

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