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The Rural-Urban DivideEconomic Disparities and Interactions in China$
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John Knight and Lina Song

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780198293309

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198293309.001.0001

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The Rural-Urban Income Divide: Macroeconomics

The Rural-Urban Income Divide: Macroeconomics

Chapter:
(p.27) 2 The Rural-Urban Income Divide: Macroeconomics
Source:
The Rural-Urban Divide
Author(s):

John Knight

Lina Song

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198293309.003.0002

This chapter states that the strategy of the Chinese government after the year 1949 was to promote rapid urban industrialization. The rural poverty would be alleviated through the transfer of peasants into the urban industrial economy. This strategy was successful, but the benefits it granted were offset by China's large population growth. The chapter also states that despite the rapid industrialization and urbanization, rural labour increased by 150% over the period, while the land was already fully occupied in 1952 and the use of the land could not be expanded significantly. It also states the important fact that the ratio of urban to rural income and consumption, per capita, was substantial during the period of Communist Party rule.

Keywords:   rural sector, urban sector, macroeconomics, income divide, urban industrialization

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