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Japan, China, and the Growth of the Asian International Economy, 1850-1949$
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Kaoru Sugihara

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780198292715

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: July 2005

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198292715.001.0001

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Japanese and British Perceptions of Japanese and British Perceptions of Chinese Boycotts in Shanghai: With Chinese Boycotts in Shanghai: With Special Reference to the Anti‐Japanese Special Reference to the Anti‐Japanese Boycotts, 1928–31

Japanese and British Perceptions of Japanese and British Perceptions of Chinese Boycotts in Shanghai: With Chinese Boycotts in Shanghai: With Special Reference to the Anti‐Japanese Special Reference to the Anti‐Japanese Boycotts, 1928–31

Chapter:
(p.127) 6 Japanese and British Perceptions of Chinese Boycotts in Shanghai: With Special Reference to the Anti‐Japanese Boycotts, 1928–31
Source:
Japan, China, and the Growth of the Asian International Economy, 1850-1949
Author(s):

Harumi Goto Shibata

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198292715.003.0006

This chapter examines the boycott movements in China. It traces the history of anti-Japanese boycotts during the period from 1928 to 1931 when the Nationalist government began implementing its program for import-substitution industrialization. Seen in the context of Sino-foreign business rivalries, the boycotts functioned to promote industrialization. In some cases, though not in others, the boycotts were more effective than the imposition of tariffs, as the former could be targeted against those goods which were manufactured in foreign-owned factories in China (such as Japanese mills in Shanghai) as well as against imported goods. Japanese and British businessmen's reaction to the boycott movements indirectly confirms that the economic aspects of this movement were important.

Keywords:   Japan, China, boycott movements, tarriffs, import-substitution industrialization

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