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The Associational EconomyFirms, Regions, and Innovation$
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Philip Cooke and Kevin Morgan

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9780198290186

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198290186.001.0001

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The Associational Economy: Introduction

The Associational Economy: Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) The Associational Economy: Introduction
Source:
The Associational Economy
Author(s):

Philip Cooke

Kevin Morgan

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198290186.003.0001

In the early 1980s in Wales, an economic crisis of major proportions had been set in motion by the neo-liberal policies of the Thatcher government. The older industrial areas of the UK were similarly afflicted by being exposed to world market prices in coal and steel industries, and mass redundancy and long-term unemployment were the results as privatization and injunction competed. This study focuses on comparative research on regions with many similarities to Wales in terms of scale and economic difficulties. In-depth studies of inter-firm and firm-agency interactions are presented for four European regions: Baden-Württemberg and Emilia-Romagna as accomplished regional economies; Wales and the Basque Country as learning regions. This study also focuses on the microeconomic issues affecting these regions and the growing emphasis on innovation as a key factor in regional economic development.

Keywords:   microeconomics, world market, Wales, Basque Country, innovation, redundancy, privatization

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