Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Role of the State in Economic Change$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ha-Joon Chang and Robert Rowthorn

Print publication date: 1995

Print ISBN-13: 9780198289845

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198289845.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 12 November 2019

The State and Industrialization in India: Successes and Failures and the Lessons for the Future  

The State and Industrialization in India: Successes and Failures and the Lessons for the Future  

Chapter:
(p.170) 7 The State and Industrialization in India: Successes and Failures and the Lessons for the Future 
Source:
The Role of the State in Economic Change
Author(s):

Ajit Singh

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198289845.003.0007

This chapter deals with the economic history of India after its independence as a colony from the United Kingdom. Jawaharlal Nehru envisaged an Indian state whose economy was patterned after the Soviet Union's central planning and he believed that the Soviet Union achieved industrialisation over a very short span of time. However, it proved to be that their move was a failure. For a couple of times they tried different kinds of reforms but still they failed. The cause of the vicious cycle that India experienced was because it is considered as a country with an economy heavily intervened by the government. Before a business may operate, it needs a lot of licenses from different bureaucratic levels. The state also controls the results of production. Hence, intervening measures made by the government should be removed.

Keywords:   India, Jawaharlal Nehru, industrialisation, United Kingdom, Soviet Union, government

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .