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The Priesthood of IndustryThe Rise of the Professional Accountant in British Management$
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Derek Matthews, Malcolm Anderson, and John Richard Edwards

Print publication date: 1998

Print ISBN-13: 9780198289609

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198289609.001.0001

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Roots of the Profession

Roots of the Profession

Chapter:
(p.16) 2 Roots of the Profession
Source:
The Priesthood of Industry
Author(s):

DEREK MATTHEWS

MALCOLM ANDERSON

JOHN RICHARD EDWARDS

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198289609.003.0002

The chapter focuses on the important developments of the accounting profession in England. It started with the origin of accounting, which can be seen in the works of the Greeks and Romans, and the accounting books of Giovanni Farolfi, where a system of double-entry bookkeeping was introduced. During the early period of accounting firms in England, these firms also provided non-accounting services. The common designation of the accountant is an accountant and auctioneer. New applicants started as an apprentice. Firms searched for new applicants through advertisements in the Glasgow Mercury. Accountancy in England was recognized as an appropriate career for the sons of the bourgeoisie. The accounting profession became more popular with the industrial revolution and increased scale of industry and commerce.

Keywords:   accounting, Giovanni Farolfi, double-entry bookkeeping, Glasgow Mercury, industrial revolution, bourgeoisie

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