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Expertise and InnovationInformation Technology Strategies in the Financial Services Sector$
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Robin Fincham, James Fleck, Rob Procter, Harry Scarbrough, Margaret Tierney, and Robin Williams

Print publication date: 1995

Print ISBN-13: 9780198289043

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198289043.001.0001

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Implementation and Innovation

Implementation and Innovation

Chapter:
(p.189) 9 Implementation and Innovation
Source:
Expertise and Innovation
Author(s):

Robin Fincham

James Fleck

Rob Procter

Harry Scarbrough

Margaret Tierney

Robin Williams

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198289043.003.0009

Implementation is the crucial phase of development in which technical capabilities and strategic objectives combine to produce economically effective systems in particular organizations. Where strategic systems are involved, sufficient novelty may be embodied for the resulting systems to be recognized as genuine innovations. Interaction between decisions made by managements in user organizations and the expertise contributed by technical personnel (internal and external) can thus result in creative outcomes with far wider applicability — a distinctive pattern of user-led innovation. Computer developments in general have owed much to user innovation, and this has been particularly marked in the financial services sector. Given the nature of information technology-based strategic innovations in the case firms in this book, users were of central importance. Aside from exploring the major features of the implementation process, this chapter examines the nature of the user-led innovation process in terms of the inputs of expertise involved. The most common features of the implementation process are discussed: uncertainty, time, organization, cost, and work.

Keywords:   implementation, user-led innovation, financial services, expertise, uncertainty, time, organization, cost, work, information technology

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