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Decolonizing KnowledgeFrom Development to Dialogue$
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Frédérique Apffel-Marglin and Stephen A. Marglin

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780198288848

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198288848.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 15 November 2019

The Economic Consequences of Pragmatism: A Re-interpretation of Keynesian Doctrine

The Economic Consequences of Pragmatism: A Re-interpretation of Keynesian Doctrine

Chapter:
(p.67) 3 The Economic Consequences of Pragmatism: A Re-interpretation of Keynesian Doctrine
Source:
Decolonizing Knowledge
Author(s):

Nancy E. Gutman

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198288848.003.0003

This chapter attempts to illustrate how John Maynard Keynes came up with an effort to reclaim the authority attributed to the lived experiences of economic agents to establish a basis for formulating various economic theories. In addressing the bias of mainstream theory against obtaining knowledge through means of experimentation, Keynes focuses on the alarming changes and events that occurred over the period in which he had expressed his thoughts. In doing so, his innovations have gone beyond mere economic theory to economic thought’s methodology. This chapter attempts to derive the prominent themes from Keynes’s works, develops these themes, and analyzes how they have resulted as consequences of his endeavours to establish the connection between human conduct and various human beliefs.

Keywords:   John Maynard Keynes, economic thought, human beliefs, human conduct, experimentation, economic theory, methodology

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