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Steel CityEntrepreneurship, Strategy, and Technology in Sheffield 1743-1993$
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Geoffrey Tweedale

Print publication date: 1995

Print ISBN-13: 9780198288664

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198288664.001.0001

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Epilogue: Steel City and United Kingdom Industrial Decline

Epilogue: Steel City and United Kingdom Industrial Decline

Chapter:
(p.388) (p.389) Epilogue: Steel City and United Kingdom Industrial Decline
Source:
Steel City
Author(s):

Geoffrey Tweedale

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198288664.003.0106

Even if the scale of operations has greatly changed from the time that Huntsman discovered the crucible steel process, visitors that toured the Sheffield steelworks in 1993 often expressed the same feelings upon watching and experiencing the steel making process. However, conflicting impressions of the Steel City may now come about when looking into the images portrayed at the melting shop at Shepcote Lane. As the 1980s approached, local government made several key changes as Sheffield began to veer away from its image of being the Steel City. The decline in the steel industry was associated with transformations in politics which initiated a shift in the relationship between local and central government. This chapter explores the implications of the decline in the steel industry on the economy of the United Kingdom.

Keywords:   United Kingdom, economy, crucible steel process, Steel City, central government, local government, political transformations

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