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Steel CityEntrepreneurship, Strategy, and Technology in Sheffield 1743-1993$
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Geoffrey Tweedale

Print publication date: 1995

Print ISBN-13: 9780198288664

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198288664.001.0001

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Rationalization and Nationalization

Rationalization and Nationalization

Chapter:
(p.331) 10 Rationalization and Nationalization
Source:
Steel City
Author(s):

Geoffrey Tweedale

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198288664.003.0089

In 1964 the members of the Iron and Steel Institute went forward with one of their pilgrimages to Sheffield and they found that the industry was evidently marked by the golden years of the 19th century. After going through various advances during the 1950s, the special steels industry of Sheffield took on a positive outlook since production levels and income levels indicated good performance during this time. The pre-eminence of Sheffield was still in the dominance of the production of alloy steel. After the first oil crisis broke, the world steel production became relatively idle and overcapacity posed a problem. As such, companies underwent restructuring measures and shifted to producing steels of a higher quality. This chapter explores the measures that looked into rationalization and nationalization.

Keywords:   Iron and Steel Institute, production, alloy steel, overcapacity, rationalization, nationalization

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