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Comparative Competition PolicyNational Institutions in a Global Market$
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G. Bruce Doern and Stephen Wilks

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780198280620

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198280620.001.0001

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Competition Policy in the European Union: Creating a Federal Agency?

Competition Policy in the European Union: Creating a Federal Agency?

Chapter:
(p.225) 8 Competition Policy in the European Union: Creating a Federal Agency?
Source:
Comparative Competition Policy
Author(s):

G. BRUCE DOERN

STEPHEN WILKS

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198280620.003.0008

This chapter illustrates the role of Directorate General IV (DG IV) in establishing the terms under which the European economy integrates. DG IV has moved competition enforcement into new areas like utility and regulation. This has innovated its legal powers, focused on some sectors and issues, and developed linkages with other policy areas. The growth in influence of Europe competition policy and of DG IV up to 1990–1 was based on a complex conjunction of factors but was grounded in quite exceptional legal powers. There are profound ambiguities running through ‘the institution’ of competition policy although the policy itself is conventionally justified in terms of economic welfare. In Europe, the competition rules are as much designed to allow equality of participation in the common market as they are to maximize the efficiency of the market.

Keywords:   Directorate General, competition, competition policy, economic welfare, institution

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