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Comparative Competition PolicyNational Institutions in a Global Market$
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G. Bruce Doern and Stephen Wilks

Print publication date: 1996

Print ISBN-13: 9780198280620

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198280620.001.0001

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The German Cartel Office in a Hostile Environment

The German Cartel Office in a Hostile Environment

Chapter:
(p.185) 7 The German Cartel Office in a Hostile Environment
Source:
Comparative Competition Policy
Author(s):

G. BRUCE DOERN

STEPHEN WILKS

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198280620.003.0007

This chapter discusses the literature on the German Cartel Office. A new dimension has gained importance in the role of the Cartel Office and its relative strength as an institution, namely the internationalization of competition and the competition of rules. The Cartel Office's task is to execute the cartel law. The 1973 reform of the cartel law gave the Office the task of merger control. Decision making is characterized by the absence of debate on how Germany's economic order under today's economic conditions should ideally look. The political environment for the Cartel Office has indeed become complex and hostile. Even in the early post-war years, Germans still had to be convinced that the market economy was the best possible solution for organizing wealth production.

Keywords:   German Cartel Office, institution, competition, cartel law, political environment, wealth production

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