Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Secular UtilitarianismSocial Science and the Critique of Religion in the Thought of Jeremy Bentham$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

James E. Crimmins

Print publication date: 1990

Print ISBN-13: 9780198277415

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198277415.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 26 May 2020

The Lancasterian Controversy and Religious Education

The Lancasterian Controversy and Religious Education

Chapter:
(p.165) 5 The Lancasterian Controversy and Religious Education
Source:
Secular Utilitarianism
Author(s):

James E. Crimmins

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198277415.003.0008

This chapter argues that Bentham's ideas on systematic education did not precede the ‘schools for all’ controversy, but rather developed as a consequence of his interest in this issue. Far from being in the vanguard of the struggle for a national system of education, Bentham came to focus on the matter at a time when it was already a hotly disputed question. Like James Mill, he was convinced that the Church had only established the National Society in order to thwart the efforts of Lancaster and others to establish nonsectarian schools. To Bentham this was just another attempt to keep the people in subservience, blind to the corruption so rife within a society dominated by the ‘alliance’.

Keywords:   National Society, systematic education, nonsectarian schools, schools for all, Lancaster, Mill

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .