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The Role of the Member of Parliament Since
1868From Gentlemen to Players$
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Michael Rush

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780198275770

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198275770.001.0001

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From Gentlemen to Players: Complementary, Separate or Conflicting Roles?

From Gentlemen to Players: Complementary, Separate or Conflicting Roles?

Chapter:
(p.212) 8 From Gentlemen to Players: Complementary, Separate or Conflicting Roles?
Source:
The Role of the Member of Parliament Since 1868
Author(s):

Michael Rush

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198275770.003.0008

This chapter focuses on how MPs see the balance between the partisan, scrutiny, and constituency roles, and whether they are perceived as complementary, separate, or conflicting. Even analytically it is not always possible to say which of the three major roles performed by MPs is actually being carried out. Voting, apart from free votes and the occasional rebellion, is the partisan role in its purest form, but even fulfilling the constituency role may be influenced by partisan considerations in terms of the issue taken up and the vigour with which particular cases or issues may be pursued. Nevertheless, it is the constituency role that is the most distinct or separate. For the most part, MPs deal with constituency issues and cases in a non-partisan manner, seeing themselves as Members of Parliament rather than members of a party.

Keywords:   Parliament, parliamentary government, MP, role of MP, voting, partisan role, constituency role

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