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Rabbinic Interpretation of Scripture in the Mishnah$
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Alexander Samely

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780198270317

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198270317.001.0001

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Appropriating Redundancy. Clause Relationships

Appropriating Redundancy. Clause Relationships

Chapter:
(p.328) 13 Appropriating Redundancy. Clause Relationships
Source:
Rabbinic Interpretation of Scripture in the Mishnah
Author(s):

Alexander Samely (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198270317.003.0013

This chapter argues that apparently redundant items of the biblical wording can be made to complement each other by distribution of semantically or numerically matching paradigms of the Mishnaic discourse. In interpreting syntactic links between clauses, there is a tendency to transform purely links into those of causal or final dependency. The chapter also notes that quantitative correspondence sometimes carries the interpretation as a whole, because one-to-one correspondences can only be established for some, not all, biblical elements. There are further resources which address the division of biblical sentences into smaller units, or the syntactical relationship between neighboring and conjoined clauses. The final section of the chapter is concerned with resources which endow certain syntactic structures, which it calls SYNTAX.

Keywords:   SYNTAX, syntactic structures, quantitative correspondence, syntactic links, biblical sentences, redundant items

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