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Verbal Syntax in the Greek PentateuchNatural Greek Usage and Hebrew Interference$
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T. V. Evans

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780198270102

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198270102.001.0001

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General Introduction

General Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 General Introduction
Source:
Verbal Syntax in the Greek Pentateuch
Author(s):

T. V. Evans

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198270102.003.0001

This study involves three interconnecting spheres of research, treating the Greek verbal system in general, translation-technical issues and the verb in the Greek Pentateuch, and specific features of Pentatcuehal verbal syntax in relation both to the underlying Hebrew and the history of the Greek language. This is accordingly presented in three parts. Part l is largely concerned with theoretical issues. Part II assembles and analyses complete data for the Masoteric Text (MT) formal matches of all verbal forms in the Greek Pentateuch. Part III contains four detailed studies on features of verbal syntax in the Greek Pentateuch. Aside from describing the aims of the study, this chapter also describes previous studies of verbal syntax in the LXX (Septuagint), general tools for study of the Koine Greek verb, and the questions concerning the text of the Greek Pentateuch.

Keywords:   LXX language, verbal syntax, Koine Greek, Greek Penteteuch

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