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Communities of the BlessedSocial Environment and Religious Change in Northern Italy, AD 200-400$
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Mark Humphries

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780198269830

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198269830.001.0001

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Portraits in a landscape: Christian origins in northern Italy

Portraits in a landscape: Christian origins in northern Italy

Chapter:
(p.72) 3 Portraits in a landscape: Christian origins in northern Italy
Source:
Communities of the Blessed
Author(s):

Mark Humphries

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198269830.003.0004

This chapter discusses the importance of archaeological records in tracing and interpreting the origin of Christianity in northern Italy. Archaeological records increase researchers' knowledge beyond what can possibly be known from medieval sources and conciliar acta, and they also provide glimpses of various Christian communities set in the context of their immediate surroundings. By correlating archaeological records with other evidence, it appears that there were about twenty identifiable Christian communities scattered across the Po valley and in Venetia et Histria. The ‘scatter’ of these Christian communities was not uniform and their density varied from region to region, with the highest concentrations near the Adriatic Coast where they cluster along the main communication routes.

Keywords:   archaeological records, Christian communities, northern Italy, conciliar acta, Po Valley, Venetia et Histria

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