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Eusebius of Caesarea’s Commentary on IsaiahChristian Exegesis in the Age of Constantine$
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Michael J. Hollerich

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780198263685

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198263685.001.0001

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The Christian Church As the Godly Polity: The Doctrine of the Church in the Commentary on Isaiah

The Christian Church As the Godly Polity: The Doctrine of the Church in the Commentary on Isaiah

Chapter:
(p.165) VI The Christian Church As the Godly Polity: The Doctrine of the Church in the Commentary on Isaiah
Source:
Eusebius of Caesarea’s Commentary on Isaiah
Author(s):

MICHAEL J. HOLLERICH

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198263685.003.0006

This chapter deals with the place of the church in Eusebius' exegesis of Isaiah. It discusses Eusebius' conception of the relation between the historical Christian church and the heavenly Jerusalem. The third section considers the role of the episcopacy as the leaders of the city of God. The fourth section discusses the place that Eusebius gives to the Roman Empire. The chapter also looks into the hierarchical principle in the church; the juxtaposition of two classes of Christians, the totally committed and the nominal; and his expectations of the end of the world and history. Eusebius was convinced that this historic community was the Sion and Jerusalem spoken of by the prophet Isaiah.

Keywords:   Jerusalem, Roman Empire, eschatology, Christian Church, episcopacy

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