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Understanding and Explaining Adjudication$
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William Lucy

Print publication date: 1999

Print ISBN-13: 9780198260257

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198260257.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.351) 8 Conclusion
Source:
Understanding and Explaining Adjudication
Author(s):

William Lucy

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198260257.003.0017

This book's overarching question — how different are orthodoxy and heresy? — received a deflationary answer, namely, ‘not very’. The responses made by orthodox and heretical accounts of adjudication to the problems of method, causality, and values are charted. The first part of this book establishes that orthodox accounts of adjudication begin by deploying the Verstehen method. This is clearly the correct starting point, but the orthodox fail to get to grips with at least one difficult snag that method faces, namely, the plurality problem. There are other snags that allegedly ensnare the orthodox method, such as the incorrigibility problem and the ideology critique; these are either avoidable or highlight issues faced by any method. In addition, this book examines whether, in taking up the method of Verstehen, the orthodoxy is thereby committed to methodological individualism. The conclusion is that it is not and that the orthodox method is best characterised by the label ‘compatibilism’.

Keywords:   orthodoxy, heresy, adjudication, Verstehen method, causality, plurality, values, individualism, compatibilism

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