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The Right to Strike$
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K. D. Ewing

Print publication date: 1991

Print ISBN-13: 9780198254393

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198254393.001.0001

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Unemployment Benefit: The Trade Dispute Disqualification

Unemployment Benefit: The Trade Dispute Disqualification

Chapter:
(p.63) [5] Unemployment Benefit: The Trade Dispute Disqualification
Source:
The Right to Strike
Author(s):

K. D. Ewing

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198254393.003.0005

This chapter starts the examination of state sanctions by considering the concept of a trade dispute disqualification from the right to recieve unemployment benefit. The effect of disqualification is to deny unemployment benefit to the claimant in respect of both himself and any dependants. After considering the function of the trade disqualification, the discussion turns to the way in which measures have evolved and have been liberalized since its introduction in 1911. These modifications have gradually narrowed the range of people affected by the disqualification to exclude innocent victims caught up in the dispute. This is then followed by a discussion of the principal features of the present law, as it operates under the Social Security Act 1975, as amended by Social Security Act 1986.

Keywords:   trade dispute disqualification, modern law, unemployment benefit, Social Security Act, disqualification

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