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Social Security in Developing Countries$
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Ehtisham Ahmad, Jean Drèze, John Hills, and Amartya Sen

Print publication date: 1991

Print ISBN-13: 9780198233008

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198233008.001.0001

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Social Security in Sub-Saharan Africa: Reflections on Policy Challenges *

Social Security in Sub-Saharan Africa: Reflections on Policy Challenges *

Chapter:
(p.395) 9 Social Security in Sub-Saharan Africa: Reflections on Policy Challenges*
Source:
Social Security in Developing Countries
Author(s):

Joachim von Braun

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198233008.003.0009

This chapter deals with the formal elements of social-security provision, as these may form important building blocks of social-security systems in the long run. It points out that for a considerable time to come, social-security policy in sub-Saharan Africa will have to concentrate on the basic needs of food and health. The chapter further emphasizes that food-security policy and health and sanitation policy are, therefore, cornerstones for social-security policy, and observes that existing formal social-security systems in Africa tend to be urban biased and to serve the privileged rather than the poor. It opines that broader approaches to social security, however, have a part to play in development and actually do already play a significant role; yet, in most instances they are, at this stage, not State-based, but rather community- and family-based systems.

Keywords:   social-security provision, sub-Saharan Africa, health policy, food-security policy, sanitation policy, urban biased, poor, family-based systems

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