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The Jesuit MythConspiracy Theory and Politics in Nineteenth-Century France$
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Geoffrey Cubitt

Print publication date: 1993

Print ISBN-13: 9780198228684

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198228684.001.0001

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The Restoration

The Restoration

Chapter:
(p.55) 2 The Restoration
Source:
The Jesuit Myth
Author(s):

Geoffrey Cubitt

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198228684.003.0003

This chapter discusses the restoration of the anti-Jesuitism movement. Although anti-Jesuitism was left without heir and staunch followers during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic upheavals, the movement managed to revive its antagonism against the Jesuits during the Restoration period. In the course of the Restoration, the anti-Jesuits began to seek new kind of protection and safeguards against Jesuitism through active public opinion and the Liberal press. Anti-Jesuits tried as well to persuade themselves, the public, including members of Parliament to devise forms of Jesuit antagonism. Restoration anti-Jesuits took the Gallician form not because of their confidence on the anti-Jesuit potential of the French Church but because the general ideological climate of the Restoration encouraged all moderate opposition to counter-revolutionary politics to do so. Although the Restoration political debate revolved around the questions of Revolution and counter-revolution, the political dispute was more on the bounds of monarchism and religious dispute within those of Catholicism.

Keywords:   restoration, anti-Jesuitism movement, Jesuits, antagonism, Jesuitism, public opinion, Gallician, Revolution, counter-revolution

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