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A New History of Ireland Volume VIIIreland 1921-84$
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J. R. Hill

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780198217527

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198217527.001.0001

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Emigration and immigration in the twentieth century: an overview

Emigration and immigration in the twentieth century: an overview

Chapter:
(p.796) Chapter XXVI Emigration and immigration in the twentieth century: an overview
Source:
A New History of Ireland Volume VII
Author(s):

J. J. Sexton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198217527.003.0026

The recession of the early 1980s caused emigration from the Republic of Ireland to reemerge, gradually at first, but on an increasing scale as the decade progressed. The annual average net outflow throughout the decade was nearly 21,000 and while this was still lower than the natural increase, it caused a deceleration in population growth. By 1991, the population had increased by only a further 80,000 to 3,526,000 some 2.5 per cent higher than the 1981 level. The early 1990s involved yet another change as net emigration virtually disappeared. While this was partly the result of a reasonably creditable growth performance, it was mainly caused by a deterioration in external labour markets, particularly in the United Kingdom. This deterred many potential emigrants from leaving and induced many of those abroad to return home.

Keywords:   recession, emigration, Republic of Ireland, population growth, labour markets, United Kingdom, emigrants

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