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A New History of Ireland Volume VIIIreland 1921-84$
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J. R. Hill

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780198217527

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198217527.001.0001

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Land and people, c. 1983

Land and people, c. 1983

Chapter:
(p.426) Chapter XVI Land and people, c. 1983
Source:
A New History of Ireland Volume VII
Author(s):

Desmond A. Gillmor

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198217527.003.0016

Irish land was put to predominantly pastoral use in the early 1980s, as it had been, except under abnormal circumstances, since clearance of the natural forests. The agrarian landscape of the early 1980s clearly bore the imprint of past conditions and influences. The land was either divided among smallholders in the locality or laid out in the new farms for former workers on the estate, landless people, or migrants. The populations in 1981 as compared with 1926 were greater by twenty-two per cent in Northern Ireland and sixteen per cent in the Republic of Ireland, but there had been considerable divergence in trends between the two areas. The most striking feature of the spatial pattern of population change within the Republic and Northern Ireland during the twentieth century had been an eastward shift in the distribution of people.

Keywords:   land, smallholders, farms, population change, Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland

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