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A New History of Ireland Volume VIIIreland 1921-84$
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J. R. Hill

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780198217527

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198217527.001.0001

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Economic progress and political pragmatism, 1957–63

Economic progress and political pragmatism, 1957–63

Chapter:
(p.294) Chapter XI Economic progress and political pragmatism, 1957–63
Source:
A New History of Ireland Volume VII
Author(s):

J. H. Whyte

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198217527.003.0011

The years 1916–1921 might seem the most important watershed in Irish history: but though they transformed the country politically, they did remarkably little to remould the social, cultural, and psychological features of the country. Many causes converged to produce this revival in the Republic of Ireland. One of the most important was economic growth, which not only had a psychological effect on the people, but also helped to bring them into greater contact with foreign influences. Northern Ireland had already shown what could be done to improve the economy through attracting foreign enterprises by means of grants and loans. A new climate in world Catholicism helped to alter the psychological climate in Ireland, which can be seen in the growing freedom of discussion in the Catholic Church. One final cause of the transformation of Irish society that took place in these years must be mentioned: the change in political leadership. All three political parties changed their leaders in these years.

Keywords:   Republic of Ireland, Irish society, economic growth, foreign enterprises, Catholicism, political parties, political leadership, Northern Ireland

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